Sunday, April 30, 2017

Mankading

Cricket is a religion in India. Everyone in India knows minute details about that game. I thought I also knew. But only last week I realized I am not that much expert on cricket. Why?
 
Indians are familiar with cricketing terms like boundary, sixer, beamer, googly, doosra, and even LBW. Oh, I forgot about the Silly Point. I don’t know if there is a smart point also. But have you heard of a term called “Mankading”. I have not. Now I know. Probably you are aware of that term.
 
This term is named after the famous Indian cricketer Vinoo Mankad. His 100th birthday is this month – April. He was one of the best Indian all-rounder. When anyone mentions Mankad in conversation, I immediately think of his world record first wicket partnership of 413 runs with Pankaj Roy against New Zealand in Madras (Chennai).

Mankading is the act of a bowler running out the batsman at the non-striker’s end as he is backing up rather than actually bowling the ball. According to cricket rules, it is legal and the bowler is permitted to so this. Even though it is allowed under cricket rules, it is considered an “unsportsman like conduct” if a bowler does that. As per cricket etiquette, the bowler is supposed to warn the batsman.
 
Vinoo Mankad used this tactic for the first time in cricket history during India’s tour of Australia in 1947. There was a lot of controversy about his action. Very few supported him. Don Bradman was one of them. So the term Mankading is named after Vinoo Mankad.
 
I personally support mankading. Otherwise, the non striker may stand half way down the pitch and score easily a tight single.
 
PS: To my US Readers. This is somewhat similar to “pick off” in baseball.

26 comments:

  1. The gentleman's game is no longer gentlemanly. The game has become highly competitive.Sledging in moderation is acceptable these days. As in love and war, all is fair in cricket too!

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    1. Thanks for your comments Mr. KP. As you said, the game has completely changed.

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  2. As Partha Sir said in comment "Cricket is no more a gentlemen game now....."
    things have really changed now...Like our life style, there is too much aggressiveness involved in the game of cricket now....so whatever is there its all fair, moreover the laws of cricket make it quite clear that the non-striker must keep within his ground until the ball has been delivered, hence by backing up too far or too early, the non-striker is very obviously gaining an unfair advantage, which should not be allowed by any means....

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    1. Thanks for your comments Irfanuddin. I agree with you that the non-striker should not get unfair advantage. But the cricket "etiquette" says that is not a good sportsmanship. The bowler is supposed to warn the non-striker.

      A few years ago, Ravichandran Ashwin mankaded a Sri Lankan Player. But the captain at that time, Virendra Sehwag, decided to let the Sri Lankan Player continue to play the game.

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  3. I did not know the term. Generally the term used in such situation is "run out" and thats what the commentators say too. This was a new learning. Thank you SG.

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    1. Thanks for your comments Insignia. If an out was given thru Mankading (which is rare)it is a "credit" for the bowler as if he took a wicket.

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  4. I knew the act but not the term. :-)

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    1. Thanks for your comments Ajeya. Now we both know the term.

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  5. Though I am not very thorough with cricket terms, I am quite familiar with it. This term is new to me! Thank you!

    Players in cricket are just after money and fame nowadays! Etiquette is absent completely.

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    1. Thanks for your comments Sandhya. Now we both know the term.

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    1. Thanks for your comments samia. And, welcome to my blog. I am glad you liked this post.

      Samia, please visit here as often as possible. Thanks.

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  7. I remember Kapil Dev mankading a Pak batsman after warning him twice. In such situation, when the batsman keeps repeating it, I think it's fair.

    Destination Infinity

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    1. Thanks for your comments Rajesh. I think it is fair (even without warning the player).

      There have been less than 10 mankading instances in first class cricket since 1947. I thought Kapil Dev mankaded South African player Peter Kirsten in 1992 at Port Elizabeth in the 2nd ODI.

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  8. Gamed and sports is not taken in sportsman spirit.So we can take the things fair if acceptance is there.Good topic.

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    1. Thanks for your comments Sarala. Agreed.

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  9. I am odd among the cricket lovers... But, learning/knowing new things is fun! Love the way you explained Mankading. Thanks!

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    1. Thanks for your comments Sindhu. I am happy you liked this post.

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  10. I am also very poor in Cricket but its good to know new thing S...

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  11. I have no interest in Cricket:(

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    1. Thanks for your comment Renu. You are very lucky.

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  12. My understanding was that you warn the no-striker once, and that everything now fair game after that.

    Thank you BTW for enhancing my vocabulary.

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    1. Thanks for your comments Karunesh. I agree with you that the etiquette is to warn the non-striker once. My question is "why".

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    2. I have no idea why. I think it is a conventional​ thing. Like apologising in tennis if the ball touches the net to one's benefit.

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